Why Black Parents Are Turning to Afrocentric Schools – The NY Times Reports

“‘I love myself!’the group of mostly black children shouted in unison. ‘I love my hair, I love my skin!’ When it was time to settle down, their teacher raised her fist in a black power salute. The students did the same, and the room hushed. As children filed out of the cramped school auditorium on their way to class, they walked by posters of Colin Kaepernick and Harriet Tubman.

It was a typical morning at Ember Charter School in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, an Afrocentric school that sits in a squat building on a quiet block in a neighborhood long known as a center of black political power.

Though New York City has tried to desegregate its schools in fits and starts since the 1954 Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, the school system is now one of the most segregated in the nation. But rather than pushing for integration, some black parents in Bedford-Stuyvesant are choosing an alternative: schools explicitly designed for black children.

Afrocentric schools have been championed by black educators who had traumatic experiences with integration as far back as the 1960s and by young black families who say they recently experienced coded racism and marginalization in integrated schools. Both groups have been disappointed by decades of efforts to address inequities in America’s largest school system…”

Click here to continue reading on The New York Times.

~

Subscribe to BlackAndMakingItTV.com for our weekly podcasts designed to help black students and emerging professionals succeed.

cropped-12633688_1134271193272432_2801912742195508017_o-6.jpg

dsc_2005Click here to schedule your tutoring session today! Whether you are a parent seeking tutoring for your child or a college student feeling overwhelmed by your classes, BAM-iT! Edu has you covered. Across academic levels, get affordable and convenient online tutoring in Math, Science, and English from black professionals excelling in their careers.

~ Ayvaunn Penn, BAM-iT! Edu Founder

.
.
.
Header image courtesy of The 74